The amazing taste of fresh Florida Grapefruit and 100% Florida Grapefruit Juice helps provide your body with essential nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium and dietary fiber – all with no added sugar.

Calcium

  • Calcium-fortified grapefruit juice is an excellent non-dairy and lactose free source of calcium.
  • Calcium aids in bone and tooth development, blood pressure regulation and muscle function.
  • Calcium has been identified as one of four Nutrients of Concern by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee.1
  • In the U.S., it is estimated that 54 million Americans have low bone density or osteoporosis.2

Folate

  • Folate is essential for growth and development. It plays a key role in DNA formation and cell division and helps guard against one form of anemia. Getting enough folic acid, which is the synthetic form of folate found in vitamin supplements and fortified foods, may help reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spine, known as neural tube defects.
  • To help reduce the risk of someday having a baby with a neural tube defect, all women capable of becoming pregnant need to get 400 micrograms of the synthetic form of folate, folic acid, every day while consuming food folate from a varied diet.10 Eat a grapefruit or drink a glass of grapefruit juice to increase the food folate in your diet.
  • To help maintain a healthy pregnancy, women’s folate needs to increase by 50 percent. 3
  • Folate may significantly modify homocysteine (an amino acid) levels in the body. When high levels of homocysteine exist in the blood, high levels have been associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease. 4
  • Some research suggests that folate may be associated with a reduced risk for certain cancers, and some diseases affecting the brain such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression. 5

Fresh Grapefruit Nutritional Values Chart

Typical Nutrition Values for
½ Medium Grapefruit (154 g)

 

%Daily Value*

Nutrient

Amount
(%Daily Value*)

Calories 60 kcal
Calories from fat 0l
Total carbohydrate 15 g (5%)
Dietary fiber 2 g (8%)
Sugars 11 g
Protein 1 g
Total fat 0 g (0%)
Sodium 0 mg (0%)
Potassium 160 mg (5%)

%Daily Value*

Vitamin C 100%
Thiamin 4%
Niacin 2%
Folate 4%
Calcium 4%
Vitamin B6 4%
Magnesium 4%
Vitamin A 35%**
Not a significant source of saturated fat, cholesterol, and iron.
*Percent Daily Value based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
**Pink or red grapefruit.
Data source: FDA, Appendix C to Part 101.–Nutrition Facts for Raw Fruits and Vegetables, Revised 7/25/2006, effective 1/1/2008. Data for thiamin, niacin, folate, vitamin B6 and magnesium from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20 (NDB 09112), accessed 9/24/2008.
Nutritional values may vary based on the variety of citrus fruit and place of origin. Refer to the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference at www.ars.usda.gov/ or check with your citrus vendor for additional information.
Information is not intended for labeling food in packaged form.

Magnesium

  • Magnesium is a mineral that helps your body generate energy and is required for the action of many enzyme systems.6
  • Heart-healthy diets that are low in sodium and rich in potassium, calcium, and magnesium may have beneficial effects on blood pressure.7

Thiamin

  • Eat a fresh grapefruit for energy! They deliver thiamin, a water-soluble vitamin that is associated with the action of many enzyme systems, the conversion of food into energy and the production/repair of DNA.
  • Foods and beverages that are good sources of thiamin should be included as part of any healthy diet.

Phytonutrients

  • The term “phytonutrients” is commonly used interchangeably with the term “phytochemical.” Phytonutrients are plant compounds which are thought to have nutritionally important or health-promoting qualities.
  • Scientists are discovering that these plant-derived components are intimately involved in fighting cellular damage, a common initiation step in the pathways for cancer, aging and a variety of diseases.
  • Unlike commonly known nutrients (protein, fat, vitamins, minerals), some of the nutritional/health roles phytonutrients play are only now being understood, so the recommended daily amounts considered “essential” for health may not yet have been determined or verified. However, the importance of phytonutrients is steadily becoming apparent as research uncovers more benefits.
  • Grapefruit naturally contains a wide array of phytonutrients; some are known as flavonoids, a class of natural compounds. Some flavonoids have been reported to have antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-carcinogenic activities which may help protect against various diseases and conditions.8 Naringin is the most common flavonoid found in grapefruit.
  • In a randomized controlled study in healthy post-menopausal women, 100% grapefruit juice consumption was associated with beneficial effects on arterial stiffness.9 Arterial stiffness increases with aging and has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. The effects seen in this study were thought to be due primarily to naringin, the major flavonoid in grapefruit juice.

Potassium

  • Grapefruit provide potassium, which is a mineral important for maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance in cells, sending nerve impulses, and helping muscles contract.
  • Potassium has been identified as a Nutrient of Concern by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee, meaning that many Americans do not get enough of this important mineral.10 Diets containing foods that are a good source of potassium and that are low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke.11

Fiber

  • Fresh grapefruit contains fiber, which may help maintain healthy cholesterol levels and assist with digestion and elimination.
  • One whole, sweet, juicy medium-sized grapefruit contains over 3 grams of dietary fiber, which may help keep you feeling full for longer.
  • Studies support that diets high in fiber have a variety of health benefits.

Vitamin A

  • Pink and red grapefruit contain beta-carotene, a carotenoid that serves as a source of vitamin A in the diet. Vitamin A is important for reproduction and growth, immune function, and helping maintain healthy vision.12
  • Carotenoids give fruits and vegetables some of their unique and vibrant colors. They also may act as antioxidants.
  • Pink and Ruby Red grapefruit contain lycopene, a carotenoid that is not converted to vitamin A in the body, but has been associated with cardiovascular benefits in some studies.13

Vitamin B6

  • Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine, helps the body process protein and carbohydrates in food and helps produce hemoglobin, a part of red blood cells that carries oxygen to all parts of the body.
  • Higher homocysteine concentrations have been identified as a risk factor for heart disease. Vitamin B6 helps the body convert homocysteine to cysteine and lower the amount of homocysteine in the blood.14

Niacin

  • Niacin helps metabolize the food you eat into energy your body can use. Niacin also is used for DNA repair and helps the body use calcium.
  • For pregnant women, niacin requirements increase almost 30% to meet higher energy demands during pregnancy.15

Vitamin C

  • Grapefruit are an excellent source of vitamin C (also known as ascorbic acid). In fact, half of one medium grapefruit or an 8-ounce glass of 100% grapefruit juice provides at least 100% of the Daily Value for vitamin C! Vitamin C may have antioxidant activity and is needed to form collagen, which forms the basis of skin, bones, and tissue.
  • Vitamin C may help support a healthy immune system to help the body resist infection. A serving of fresh grapefruit can provide vitamin C and a host of other nutrients that your immune system needs to stay strong and healthy.16,17 Fruit and vegetables, especially citrus fruit, are primary contributors of vitamin C in the diet. Low fat diets rich in fruits and vegetables (foods that are low in fat and may contain dietary fiber, vitamin A, or vitamin C) may reduce the risk of some types of cancer, a disease associated with many factors.18 Vitamin C found in Florida grapefruit can help support collagen production, which is associated with the maintenance of healthy skin and gums. Collagen breakdown in the skin may lead to the appearance of premature aging.
  • Citrus foods like grapefruit are high in vitamin C, which may help aid the absorption of non-heme iron (the iron found in plants like spinach, not meat products) and vitamin C-rich foods should be consumed daily to help get the most iron from foods. 19,20 So including grapefruit before eating a spinach salad may help your body absorb more iron from the spinach.
  • Vitamin C is important for healthy body growth! It helps babies grow and helps build strong bones and teeth. And, it helps the expecting mom’s body absorb certain forms of iron. Vitamin C requirements are 13 percent higher when a woman is expecting.21

References

  1. USDA/DHHS. Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee. Available at: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/.
  2. National Osteoporosis Foundation. http://nof.org/articles/4.
  3. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes. The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2006.
  4. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington DC: National Academy Press, 1998.
  5. Present Knowledge in Nutrition. Tenth Edition. John W. Erdman Jr., Ian A. Macdonald and Steven H. Zeisel (eds). Washington, DC: International Life Sciences Institute and Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
  6. Present Knowledge in Nutrition. Tenth Edition. John W. Erdman Jr., Ian A. Macdonald and Steven H. Zeisel (eds). Washington, DC: International Life Sciences Institute and Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
  7. Appel LJ et al. Hypertension. 2006;47:296-308.
  8. Yao LH et al. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 2004;59:113-122.
  9. Habauzit V et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 May 27. pii: ajcn104646. [Epub ahead of print].
  10. USDA/DHHS. Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Advisory Committee. Available at: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/.
  11. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition. A Food Labeling Guide. September, 1994 (Editorial revisions June, 1999). Appendix C: Health Claims. Available at http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/flg-6c.html.
  12. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. Washington DC: National Academy Press, 2001.
  13. Present Knowledge in Nutrition. Tenth Edition. John W. Erdman Jr., Ian A. Macdonald and Steven H. Zeisel (eds). Washington, DC: International Life Sciences Institute and Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
  14. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington DC: National Academy Press, 1998.
  15. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes. The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2006.
  16. Scrimshaw N, SanGiovanni J. Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;66:464S-477S.
  17. Calder P. Br J Nutr. 2002;88:S165-S176.
  18. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Guidance for Industry: A Food Labeling Guide (11. Appendix C: Health Claims). Available at http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm064919.htm.
  19. USDA. 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Available at: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/dietaryguidelines.htm.
  20. Present Knowledge in Nutrition. Tenth Edition. John W. Erdman Jr., Ian A. Macdonald and Steven H. Zeisel (eds). Washington, DC: International Life Sciences Institute and Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.
  21. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes. The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2006.