PRE-NATAL

Vitamin C

  • Helps form collagen for the baby’s developing bones and tissue
  • Promotes the absorption of plant-based iron to help fight anemia, which in the early stages of pregnancy may increase the risk for pre-term birth and low birth weight
  • Supports a healthy immune system
  • One 8-ounce glass of 100 percent orange juice provides most of the 85 milligrams of vitamin C needed on a daily basis by pregnant adult women.1

Folate (Folic Acid)

  • Essential for fetal cell division, DNA production, growth and development
  • Before and during early pregnancy, women of childbearing age should get 400 micrograms of folic acid from supplements and/or fortified foods every day while also consuming a healthy diet that includes foods with natural folate, such as 100 percent orange juice, to help reduce their risk of having a baby with a birth defect of the brain and spine.2
  • Pregnant women need 600 micrograms of folate each day.1 Florida orange juice is one of the few fruit juices considered a good source of natural folate and is a great addition to a folate-rich diet.

Potassium

  • Helps maintain proper fluid balance
  • Helps regulate normal heart beat, muscle function and energy production
  • Supports healthy blood pressure when coupled with a low sodium diet
  • One 8-ounce glass of 100 percent Florida orange juice provides 14 percent of the Daily Value for potassium.

Calcium

  • Supports bone health and production in mother and child. Especially important in the later stages of pregnancy when the baby’s skeleton is developing.
  • May help pregnant women maintain healthy blood pressure
  • Calcium-fortified orange juice is an excellent, non-dairy source of calcium, typically providing 300 to 350 milligrams per serving, or about one-third of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for pregnant women.1

KIDS & TEENS

Body Weight

  • Orange juice counts as a fruit serving, helping to complement the intake of whole fresh fruit
  • Orange juice is a nutrient-rich replacement for added sugar beverages
  • Studies suggest that consumption of orange juice is not associated with increased body weight in children or adolescents and children who consumed orange juice had higher intakes of key nutrients and a better quality diet compared to those not consuming orange juice.3
  • Be sure to follow the American Academy of Pediatrics’ guideline/limits for 100% juice consumption for children – 4-6 ounces/day for children age 1 to 6 and 8-12 ounces/day for older children.4
  • Ensure your child has a healthy and varied diet and gets plenty of physical activity

Vitamin C

  • Supports collagen production for developing bones and tissue
  • Supports a healthy immune system
  • Helps with the healing of cuts and scrapes
  • A 6-ounce glass of 100 percent orange juice provides 100 percent or more of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin C for children ages one through six.1

Calcium

  • A key building block for strong, healthy bones
  • It is recommended that children ages one to eight years get 700-1000 milligrams of calcium daily, and teenagers need even more – 1300 mg1
  • Calcium-fortified orange juice can be an excellent source of calcium to help enhance calcium intake for kids and teens.

Potassium

  • Help muscles function properly during physical activity
  • One hundred percent orange juice is a sodium-free, nutrient-rich beverage containing potassium, which may help maintain muscle function and a healthy cardiovascular system.

Thiamin

  • Helps the body convert food into energy
  • An 8-ounce glass of orange juice provides 18 percent of the Daily Value for thiamin.

Folate

  • Important for the formation of new cells to support growth and development
  • Assists with the production of red blood cells, which supply the body with oxygen to help maintain energy levels

YOUNG ADULTS

Vitamin C

  • Supports collagen production for bone and tissue
  • Supports a health immune system to help a young adult’s body in its natural fight against infection
  • One 8-ounce glass of 100 percent Florida orange juice provides 100 percent or more of the Daily Value for vitamin C

Potassium

  • Helps young adults lead an active lifestyle with its involvement in functions that release energy from protein, fat and carbohydrates during metabolism
  • Helps regulate the body’s nerve functions, heartbeat and may help maintain healthy blood pressure when coupled with a low sodium diet
  • Eight ounces of 100% orange juice is a good source of potassium and contains organic acids like citric acid. The combination of these compounds may help the body regulate acidity. Unregulated, higher levels of acidity could lead to loss of calcium from bone.

Folate

  • To help reduce the risk of birth defects of the brain and spine, women of childbearing age should get 400 micrograms of folic acid from supplements and/or fortified foods every day (even when not planning a pregnancy), while also consuming a healthy diet that includes foods with natural folate, such as 100 percent orange juice.2
  • An 8-ounce glass of 100 percent Florida orange juice contains about 11 percent of the Daily Value of 400 micrograms.

Calcium

  • Aids in bone development and maintenance. May help young adults reduce their risk for osteoporosis in later years by helping to optimize bone health.
  • May help support healthy blood pressure and muscle function, helping to keep young bodies active and strong
  • Calcium-fortified orange juice can be an excellent source of calcium to help enhance calcium intake

Thiamin

  • Helps the body convert food into energy
  • An 8-ounce glass of orange juice provides 18 percent of the Daily Value for thiamin.

Plant Nutrients

  • Found naturally in plants, including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
  • When consumed, they may provide nutritional and health benefits throughout life
  • Orange juice and its plant nutrient, hesperidin, have been associated with benefits toward blood vessel function5 and some measures of cognition in young adults.6

ADULTS 45+

Vitamin C

  • May have antioxidant activity in the body and help mitigate inflammation. Chronic inflammation may lead to a number of chronic health issues.
  • Supports collagen production for skin and tissue health
  • Helps support a healthy immune system
  • Helps promote wound healing

Potassium

  • Potassium may play an important role in cardiovascular health and diets containing foods that are a good source of potassium and that are low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke.8
  • One-hundred percent orange juice is a good source of potassium and contains organic acids like citric acid. The combination of these compounds may help your body neutralize acidity. Higher levels of acidity could lead to loss of calcium from bone.
  • One 8-ounce glass of orange juice provides 14 percent of the recommended Daily Value.

Folate (Folic Acid)

  • May help maintain blood homocysteine levels. Elevated homocysteine in the blood has been identified as a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disease.2
  • May play a role along with other B vitamins in supporting brain health7
  • One 8-ounce glass of 100 percent orange juice each day provides 11 percent of the Daily Value for folate.

Calcium

  • Helps support bone and tooth health
  • Important for cardiovascular health, blood pressure regulation and muscle function
  • An 8-ounce glass of calcium-fortified orange juice provides about one-third of the Daily Value for calcium.

Thiamin

  • Helps the body to convert food into energy
  • An 8-ounce glass of orange juice provides 18 percent of the Daily Value for thiamin.

Magnesium

  • May help support cardiovascular health, healthy blood pressure, and bone health
  • An 8-ounce glass of orange juice supplies 7 percent of the Daily Value for magnesium.

Plant Nutrients

  • Found naturally in plants, including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains
  • When consumed, they may provide nutritional and health benefits throughout life
  • Orange juice and its plant nutrient, hesperidin, have been associated with benefits toward blood vessel function5 and some measures of cognition in older adults.6

References

  1. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary Reference Intakes: The Essential Guide to Nutrient Requirements. Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006.
  2. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. Washington DC: National Academy Press, 1998.
  3. O’Neil CE et al. Nutrition Research. 2011;31:673–682.
  4. Daniels S and Hassink S. Pediatrics. 2015;136:e275-3292.
  5. Morand C et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93:73–80.
  6. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Guidance for Industry: A Food Labeling Guide (11. Appendix C: Health Claims). January 2013. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm064919.htm
  7. McGarel K et al. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2015;74:46–55.