FDOC responds to NPR story

We were happy to have our voice included in yesterday’s story on NPR that described how citrus growers are managing through citrus greening and other market trends in today’s challenging environment. However, it is disappointing that the report included misinformation from Dr. Barry Popkin, a professor at the University of North Carolina, about 100% juice and health. His statement that “every study that followed people for more than a day has shown an adverse effect on cardiovascular health from fruit juice…” is simply wrong.

In reality, a considerable body of clinical and observational scientific evidence exists that supports a beneficial role for 100 percent juice – particularly orange juice – on some health or nutritional indicators, including those related to cardiovascular disease.1-5 In addition, consumption of 100% orange juice has not been associated with detrimental effects on markers of glucose or insulin metabolism, including risk for metabolic syndrome, in clinical2,6 or observational4 studies, or a recent meta-analysis7. Further, with respect to 100% fruit juice intake and weight measures:

  • Clinical studies in adults report no adverse effects on body weight or body mass index (BMI) when 100% orange juice is included as part of the diet.1,2,8
  • A systematic review of the association between 100% fruit juice intake and weight in children and adolescents reported that after assessing 21 cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, more than two-thirds of the studies found no association between 100% juice intake and adiposity – even when juice was consumed in amounts exceeding current recommendations.9
  • Epidemiological studies report no association between 100% orange or citrus juice intake and body weight, BMI, or changes in BMI over time in children or adolescents.4,10,11
  • Epidemiological studies report that 100% orange juice or 100% fruit juice consumption by adults was associated with lower body weight or BMI, or lower risk for overweight/obesity compared to no consumption.3,12
  • A comprehensive analysis published in 2014 by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Evidence Analysis Library concluded that the evidence does not support an association between 100% fruit juice intake and weight status or adiposity in children.13

The bottom line is that these and other supportive research clearly report nutritional and other benefits of 100 percent orange juice consumption.

References

  1. Basile LG, et al. Proc Fla State Hort Soc.2010;123:228–233.
  2. Morand C, et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(1):73–80.
  3. O’Neil CE, et al. Nutrition Journal. 2012;11:107 (12 December 2012).
  4. O’Neil CE, et al. Nutrition Research. 2011;31(9):673–682.
  5. Lui K, et al. PLoS One. 2013:8(4):e61420 (Epub ahead of print).
  6. Simpson EJ, et al. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2012:71:E182 (abstract).
  7. Wang B, et al. PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e95323.
  8. Cesar TB, et al. Nutrition Research. 2010;30(10):689–694.
  9. O’Neil C, et al. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 2008;2(4): 315-354.
  10. Forshee R et al. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2003;54(4):297-307.
  11. Vanselow MS, et al. Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;90(6):1489-1495.
  12. Pereira MA et al. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29(6):625-629.
  13. Evidence Analysis Library (EAL), Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Dietary and Metabolic Impact of Fruit Juice Consumption Evidence Analysis Project. Available at: www.andevidencelibrary.com. 2014.